Tag Archives: Build Log

100cc Extra 260 KS Canister Install

I have had an issue with my AeroWorks 100cc Extra 260 being very loud.  The 3W 110cc CS engine, on stock exhaust, runs about 120db.  Which is not AMA legal and most flying fields won’t let you fly there; as there are noise restrictions.

With that said, I decided to install KS canisters.  This airplane is designed for installing canisters which makes the installation process easier.

The first step in this process was to work with Gerhard, at Aircraft International, to make sure I was getting the right parts for this airplane and engine.  Gerhard spent quite a bit of time with me and I was able to order and receive everything I needed.  On a side note, I highly recommend working with Aircraft International for all of your 3W needs.  I have always received great service and, when ordering anything, very prompt shipping.

The install went very smooth.  All in all it took me about 10 hours total.  The most significant amount of time was spent encapsulating all of the bays.  I used 1/16″ plywood and blocked the bulkhead behind the canisters and all bays that hold electronics.  This is absolutely necessary so the fuselage doesn’t become pressurized and blow off your covering and to keep your electronics cool.

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I measured and cut plywood to cover the bulkhead behind the canisters.  I then cut a 1/4″ plywood canister mount.  You can see this in the image above.  This made it easy for me to epoxy the canister mounts.

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Once the canister were installed the way I wanted, I created a bolt-on cover so I would have easy access for canister maintenance.

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I used flex-headers so I could get the correct drop and positioning I wanted.

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Lastly, I relocated the throttle servo and modified the canister tunnel cover to give it a clean look.

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Yesterday I took the plane out for a few flights.  I had to make a few minor low and high carb adjustments as the canisters produce more back-pressure then the stock exhaust.

These new KS canisters brought the noise level down to 96db, a very big difference.  The plane sounds great!

Thank you Gerhard, at Aircraft International, for your help with the parts.  And thank you Morris and Phil, at the field, for helping me get this thing dialed in!

AeroWorks 30cc Extra 260 Conversion to Electric – Motor Mounted

This is the second article in my AeroWorks 30cc Extra 260 electric conversion project.  In the first article, I listed all of the electric parts I am using in the build.  In this article I show how the electric motor is installed.

I mounted the electric motor in my AeroWorks 30cc Extra 260 yesterday.

30cc Freestyle Extra 260 - 09Here is what the airplane looked like with the DLE 35cc RA engine.

 

 

 

 

 

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And here is what the airplane looks like now, with the electric motor.

I used the same DLE standoffs and fabricated a simple motor mount.

 

 

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It is simple, light and rock solid.

 

 

 

 

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I was a little concerned about how this would come together, but all in all, I am very pleased with the end result.

 

 

 

 

 

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The ESC is mounted below to get as much air cooling as possible.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tomorrow I plan to complete the installation and go flying!

AeroWorks 30cc Extra 260 Conversion to Electric

I have been flying my AeroWorks 30cc Extra 260, 76″ wingspan, for over a year now.  I have more then 200 flights on it and absolutely love it.  Its a wonderful aircraft and can do any aerobatic maneuver you ask of it.  The only issue I have had with the airplane is the DLE 35cc RA gas engine.  I have done just about everything I know of to resolve the “load up” issues, I have finally given up on it.

Electric power is so advanced now that I thought this would be a good airplane to convert.  I have been flying smaller electric airplanes for ever but this is the first of this size.

After many conversations and questions on RC Groups, asking friends and other experts, I finally settled on the following configuration:

Electric Motor MOTROLFLY DM-4330-298
298Kv, 2700 watts
ESC ZTW Gecko OPTO 120amp HV ESC
Arming Switch MPI Spark-eliminating, High Voltage Arming Switch
Connectors EC5
Motor/ESC Connectors 5.5mm Bullet
Batteries 8S 6600mAh, (2) 4S batteries in series

Here is the new motor, ESC, arming switch and series battery connector all wired together.
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Next, I need to get it mounted in to the airplane. I am currently waiting for some additional parts. As soon as its all mounted, I will take some pictures!

T-6A Texan II – Build Log

About two weeks ago, I started building a T-6A Texan II.  This is the Beechcraft version built by Raytheon Aircraft Company.

In the image above, the fuselage is about complete.  I am fitting the cockpit items; dahs and pilots.  None of this is glued in place yet; I still have some trimming of the front dash to do.

This should be a very cool airplane!

Specifications

Wing Span 63.0″
Wing Area 647.9 square inches
Flying Weight 8 to 9 pounds
Length 58.3″
Motor Working on power configuration.
E-flite Power 90 or Power 110?
Hacker A50-16L?
UPDATE – I’ve made my decision.  I’m going with the E-flite Power 90, 8S 5000mAh batteries and 16×8 prop.  This will produce 1800 watts max. which is plenty of power for this aircraft.
Retracts 60-120 Tricycle Electric Retracts by E-flite

Here you can read the other articles about this build process.

About the Beechcraft T-6A Texan II

The Beechcraft T-6 Texan II is a single-engined turboprop aircraft built by the Raytheon Aircraft Company (which became Hawker Beechcraft and is now Beechcraft Corporation).  Based on the Pilatus PC-9, the T-6A is used by the United States Air Force for basic pilot training and by the United States Navy for Primary and Intermediate Joint Naval Flight Officer (NFO) and Air Force Combat Systems Officer (CSO) training.  It has replaced the Air Force’s Cessna T-37B Tweet and is replacing the Navy’s T-34C Turbo Mentor.  The T-6A is also used as a basic trainer by the Royal Canadian Air Force (CT-156 Harvard II), the German Air Force, the Greek Air Force, the Israeli Air Force (Efroni), and the Iraqi Air Force.  The T-6C is used for training by the Royal Moroccan Air Force and the Mexican Air Force.  The Royal New Zealand Air Force will also begin operating the type in 2015.