Tag Archives: Project Management

SharePoint 2013 Management, Architecture and Design Course – Register Today

How many times have you been told the solution to your SharePoint 2013 needs require custom .NET development? Unfortunately, many consultants and consulting firms resort to custom .NET development because they are unfamiliar with how to truly architect solutions in SharePoint 2013. Granted, a certain amount of custom .NET development is required for most implementations; however, having a thorough understanding of how to architect your information to support business contextual needs, is the key to dramatically reducing those custom efforts and gaining more long-term value.

The truth is, most SharePoint Intranet, Document Management, Knowledge Management, Records Management and Collaboration solutions can be implemented with less than 10% custom development efforts. Implementing SharePoint 2013 using fundamental IA principals and techniques will reduce the need for custom development efforts, the cost of maintaining those efforts and the length of time you are tied to a consulting firm because of those efforts.

Start gaining the most value from Microsoft SharePoint 2013 today!

Join 5-year Microsoft SharePoint MVP, Bob Mixon, for a virtual hands-on 5-day, in-depth course and learn how to successfully apply Information Architecture techniques to SharePoint 2013. This course is geared to provide you with a thorough understand of Information Architecture and how to solve “real world” business problems on the SharePoint 2013 platform.

Register for our August 18, 2014 Class Today!

For complete course information and registration, see:

http://collectiveknowledgesolutions.com/sharepoint-2013-intranet-management-design-and-architecture-training/

We are now accepting Early Bird registration! Use the code CKS-SPMAD-2013-ID-JULY2014 before the end of July and receive a 10% discount!

10 Key Elements of Enterprise Information Architecture (#IA) – #1 Content Categorization

This article is the first in a series of ten that will help you better understand the 10 key elements of Enterprise Information Architecture (#IA).

Information Architecture consists of many techniques and principals that are required to ultimately add value to day-to-day business operations. When we look at everything involved with Information Architecture, it can be overwhelming and complex. For these reasons, I have broken down Information Architecture in to the following 10 Key Elements. These are by no means all inclusive but what can be considered the most important.

  1. Content Categorization (this article)
    Content Categorization – Common Categorization and Grouping Mistake
  2. Understanding
  3. Presentation
  4. Evolution
  5. Responsibility
  6. Process
  7. Metadata
  8. Search
  9. Security
  10. Governance

Content Categorization

In this first article, we will focus on Content Categorization.  It is the first of the 10 Key Elements of Enterprise Information Architecture and , surprisingly, the one that is most often overlooked.

If you currently have SharePoint installed in your environment and are encountering issues, such as little organization, users unable to find their content, low adoption rate, etc., then you have most likely implemented your solution with little to no Information Architecture.

Content Categorization and classification is the process by which we identify and group content.  One key success factor for all SharePoint implementations is to reduce, if not eliminate, the question “where do I store and manage my content”.  Content Categorization and classification aids with this by providing a specific location and manner by which users store and manage their content.

Content Categorization and classification is one of the primary ways we query content for improved search relevancy and aggregation.

Content Classification
Content Classification consists of labeling types of content using labels that precisely describe what the content is. For example instead of all documents being labeled as merely a Document type, we classify our documents with more precise labels; such as Policy Document, Client Contract Document, Vendor Contract Document, Project Plan Document, Medical Benefit Document, etc.

Content Classification in SharePoint is accomplished by using content types. A content type defines a single data type, such as Policy Document, and supports associating metadata, a template document, workflow and policies.

05.03.01 - Policy Document Content Type

Once your content has been classified, it becomes a relatively simple process to create search scopes (result sources) and points of aggregation. For example, it is quite easy to create a result source containing all documents of type Policy Document. We can then search all documents of type Policy Document and/or aggregate all Policy Documents to a policy book.

Content Grouping
Grouping consists of grouping content of similar type. For example a document library, in SharePoint, named Documents really doesn’t have much meaning and certainly doesn’t tell a user what is stored in it. However, a document library named Policy Documents or Benefit Documents clearly defines what is contained within.

05.03.01 - Policy Documents Library

Another example would be a Meeting Documents library, on a project site. The Meeting Documents library might contain meeting agenda, meeting minutes and meeting action items documents. In this example, the Meeting Documents is the document grouping principal and is a container for managing all documents related to project meetings.

Content Grouping isn’t limited to lists and libraries. Each container level in SharePoint can be used to apply grouping principals. Each of the following is a grouping container in SharePoint.

  • SharePoint Farm – The top-most grouping level in SharePoint.       A corporate solution will have 1 to many SharePoint farms.
    • Web Application – Each SharePoint farm will include 1 to many web applications.
      • Site Collection – Each web application will contain 1 to many site collections.
        • Top-level Site – Each site collection will have a single top-level site.
          • List – Each top-level site can have 0 to many lists.
          • Document Library – Each top-level site can have 0 to many document libraries.
            • Folder – Each library can have 0 to many folders. (See Note Below)
          • Sub-sites – Each top-level site can have 0 to many sub-sites.
            • List – Each sub-site will have 0 to many lists.
            • Document Library – Each sub-site can have 0 to many document libraries.
              • Folder – Each library can have 0 to many folders. (See Note Below)

 

As you can see there are many grouping levels that can be applied to your SharePoint implementation. Each of these grouping levels has a very specific purpose and is used for many different reasons.

The goal is to reduce the use of folders and expand them to document libraries instead. It is also very common to group similar information, by topic, by site. For example, you may wish to have a sub-site, below the top-level site for each department, titled Policies & Procedures. This site would contain many lists and libraries all related to human resources policies & procedures; i.e. policy documents, procedure documents, FAQ’s, glossary terms, etc.

Note About Library Folders

The regular use of folders in libraries is not considered a best practice. There are very specific cases when folders do make sense and are used; however, these cases are limited.

SharePoint 2013 Intranet Management, Design and Architecture Training

These ten elements are defined, in detail, in my SharePoint 2013 Management, Design and Architecture Training Course.  For those of you who recall my Information Architecture course for SharePoint 2010, this new course expands on all the new features of both on-premise and Office 365 environments.

If you are interested in learning more about how to implement a SharePoint 2013 Intranet solution, please register for our next class.

SharePoint Saturday Sacramento – May 31, 2014

 

spsevents250x250SHAREPOINT SATURDAY

May 31, 2014

Sacramento

 

The Northern California SharePoint Community is proud to host the 3rd SharePoint Saturday Sacramento

Join fellow SharePoint colleagues in attending over 25 sessions presented by MVPs, MCMs and other SharePoint leaders. Topics include:

  • SharePoint 2013/2010
  • Office 365 / SPO
  • Business Intelligence
  • Case Studies
  • Search
  • Social & Mobile with SharePoint Reporting
  • And more …

This event is FREE and open to the public. Network, learn and immerse yourself in tips, tricks and ideas from leading SharePoint Experts from around the country.

WHERE & WHEN
Patrick Hayes Learning Center
2700 Gateway Oaks Drive
Sacramento, CA 95833

Saturday, May 31, 2014
8:00 AM to 5:00 PM (PST)

REGISTRATION
Registration is required to attend.
http://spssac2014.eventbrite.com

Admission: Free

Continental breakfast, snacks and lunch are included. Parking is free, but space is limited.

Register now at http://spssac2014.eventbrite.com

Tasks409x200

SharePoint 2013 Task Management

Task Management

The task management functionality available in SharePoint 2013 has many new and improved features. Features such as the ability to create sub-tasks, a new timeline view, more robust management of tasks using Microsoft Project 2013 and so on. In this article I will take a deeper look in to these new and enhanced features of SharePoint 2013 Task Management.

For the purposes of this topic, I have created an “out-of-box” site using the Project Site template. No customizations have been made to the site, libraries or lists. The figure below is our demonstration site, using the standard Project Site template.

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The figure below shows the standard Tasks list that is included with the Project Site template. The list itself is very similar to what we found in earlier versions of SharePoint. However, you will notice a timeline view is now available. More about the timeline view later.

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Task Assignment

An improvement in SharePoint 2013 task management is the ability to assign multiple resources to a task. In previous versions, you could only assign a single resource which made using the “out-of-box” task management cumbersome when managing more complex projects.

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Subtasks

You now have the ability to create subtasks which is another new feature found in SharePoint 2013. I believe this was primarily implemented to support Microsoft Project integration. More on Microsoft Project integration below.

To create a subtask, click the parent item context menu and select the Create Subtask option.

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The figure below shows our task list after adding 2 subtasks.

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Timeline View

The timeline view provides you with the ability to display specified tasks in a timeline, or Gantt, style view. The timeline view can be enabled or disabled for any task list in SharePoint. This is accomplished by editing the web part properties and checking/unchecking the Show timeline option.

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You can add and remove tasks from a timeline by clicking the task item context menu and selecting Add to Timeline or Remove from Timeline option.

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In the figure below, you can see that I have added the Human Resources Intranet Requirements task to the timeline. You will find the timeline view is best suited to display high-level tasks and milestones. If you add too many tasks it will become cluttered and difficult to read.

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Aggregating Tasks to Your Personal Site

One of the best new features available in SharePoint 2013 is the aggregation of tasks, assigned to you, in your personal site. This provides you with a view of all tasks, across the entire farm, aggregated in one place. This means, regardless of where a task resides (a department site, project site, team site, etc.) they will all be aggregated to your personal site.

To accomplish this in the past, we had to customize a solution using search web parts, create a custom developed solution or purchase a 3rd party tool.

Note: The personal site task aggregation feature utilizes the SharePoint FAST search engine to index task information and make it available for querying. This means, tasks will not be aggregated to your personal site until the search indexer has processed the tasks.

To see an aggregate view of all your assigned tasks, simply go to your personal site and click the Tasks link in the left vertical navigation area.

In the figure below, you can see the tasks assigned to myself.

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You might have also noticed, when you click a task item context menu, you have the ability to edit the task and go directly to the containing site or list. The is very convenient for managing tasks that reside in many locations of your Intranet.

Managing Tasks with Microsoft Project

Microsoft has made the management of SharePoint tasks, in Microsoft Project very convenient. To open a task list in Microsoft Project, simply navigate to the task list and click the Open with Project option on the ribbon bar.

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Now that your SharePoint task list is open in Microsoft Project, you can use all of the features available in Microsoft Project.

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After you make updates, in Microsoft Project, and save them, all of those updates are posted to the SharePoint task list.

Note: You may be asking yourself, Microsoft Project has many more features and fields then a SharePoint task list; is this information lost when you close Microsoft Project? The answer is no! Microsoft Project and SharePoint are tightly integrated and the actual project file is also saved to the site; in the Site Assets library.

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Extending Microsoft Project Fields to a Task List

There may be situations when you wish to publish additional information from Microsoft Project to your task list in SharePoint. This can be easily accomplished by mapping fields using the following steps.

For the purposes of our demonstration, I will map the Duration field from Microsoft Project to our task list in SharePoint.

  1. In Microsoft Project, click the File tab in the ribbon bar.
  2. In the Info section, click the Map Fields button.

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  1. In the Map Fields dialog, click the Add Field button.
  2. In the Add Field dialog, for the Existing Project Field, select Duration from the drop-down list.
  3. For the New SharePoint Column, leave the default as Duration.
  4. Click the OK button when you have completed these steps.
  5. Click the OK button in the Map Fields dialog when you have mapped all the desired fields.

Now the Duration field in Microsoft Project is mapped to a new Duration field in the SharePoint task list. Save your project and the SharePoint task fields will be updated, containing the mapped field values.

As you can see in the figure below, the Duration field now contains the duration information from Microsoft Project.

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Once you start editing and managing your project tasks in Microsoft Project, I have learned that it is easier to continue using Microsoft Project; instead of switching from editing tasks in SharePoint some of the time and in Microsoft Project other times.

Conclusion

As you can see there are many new and improved task management features found in SharePoint 2013. The ability to assign more than one resource to a task and the timeline view are of my personal favorites. In addition, I use the Microsoft Project integration on virtually all project management scenarios I am involved with.

It is important to note; all of the features described in this article are available in Office 365. I use Office 365 to run my business and manage all client projects and these task management features and Office integration I use on a daily basis.

If you are interested in discussing these features, obtaining a demonstration of how they may improve your task management needs in your environment, please Contact Me. If you have any questions or comments, please leave a comment below; I will answer as I have availability.